Yoshiwara station - yoshiwara
Yoshiwara station - yoshiwara
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Japanese prints

Katsushika Hokusai

1760 - 1849

YOSHIWARA STATION - YOSHIWARA - 1806 ca.

Colour woodblock print
Vertical chuban; mm 232x175 sheet size
Signature: none

Series: ‘The fifty-three stations of the Tokaido’
             ‘Tokaido Gojusan Tsugi’
Very good impression, colour and condition, wormhole restored.
For a similar print see the collection at the Art Institute Chicago Collection (link).

Two women, a man and a boy treading grapes in a wine press.

Matthi Forrer: ‘Hokusai: a guide to the serial graphics’, the Heron press, Philadelphia-London, 1974, page 54, series 72, station n. 15.

Comments on: Katsushika Hokusai

Katsushika Hokusai, dominated the scene of the art of the Japanese print (Ukiyo-e) in the field of book illustration, drawing and painting. He was born in the Honjo district of Edo. His passion for art began at an early age; he was adopted by an illustrious family of artisans who introduced him to wood engraving. This influenced his career and at the age of 18 he entered at the studio of Katsukawa Shunsho (1726-1793), who specialised in prints depicting the popular Kabuki theatre. Under the pseudonym of Shunro, around the 1780s, he got to know artists like Shigemasa (1739-1820) and Kiyonaga (1752-1815) who influenced his drawing of figures. Around 1790 he produced his first important prints which he signed Kako. He also produced fine Surimono. In 1797 he married and took the name Hokusai, becoming one of the foremost illustrators and artists of Japan. Among his most famous work are the ehon, books of images, as the 15 albums of drawings entitled Manga. The most celebrated of his prints series is The thirty-six views of Mount Fuji, early thirties. Amongst his many pupils: Shinsai, Hokuju, Hokuba, Hokkei, Shigenobu. Around 1790 he produced his first important prints which he signed “Kako”. He also produced fine Surimono. In 1797 he married and took the name Hokusai, becoming one of the foremost illustrators and artists of Japanese prints. Among his most famous work are the “ehon”, books of images of Edo, circa 1800; 15 albums of drawings entitled “Manga”, circa 1814; the prints series “The thirty-six views of Mount Fuji” circa 1830 and the three volumes “One hundred views of Fuji”, circa 1834-35. Amongst his pupils were Shinsai, Hokuju, Hokuba, Hokkei, Shigenobu
notes: Sold